Almost 18 years ago I lost my mother to cancer. As might be expected, walking with her through the highs and lows of her 7 year battle had a significant impact on my life… impacts I’m sure I’ve yet to discover. When we lose someone we are forever changed – and often the loss brings us closer to each other. For me, the warm embrace of the hundreds (the police needed to provide crowd control – she was that well-loved) who turned out for my mother’s funeral mass brought me comfort and security. In community, we remembered her life and prayed for her as she joined the angels in heaven. My siblings – especially my sister and I – came together to comfort each other. To this day we are a closer due to the loss we suffered.

What happens when one of our homeless brothers or sisters who are disconnected from society pass from this life? How do we come together, deepen our relationships and recognize the impact of their passing? For the past eight years The Homeless Remembrance Project has worked to create a place in the city of Seattle that we can remember the thousands of men and women who’ve died – and WILL die – while homeless.

Photo Courtesy of The Homeless Remembrance Project

This Saturday, June 23 at 3pm the first 2012 Leaf installation for 14 men and women will take place at the  Seattle Mennonite Church, in Lake City. Join us! This will be a wonderful opportunity to deepen our relationships while remembering our brothers and sisters.

Leaf Installation sites are “scattered” across the city, originating from the “Tree of Life” sculpture and gathering place at Victor Steinbrueck Park (north of Pike Place Market). To learn more, visit The Homeless Remembrance Project  or the great Crosscut article that ran today.

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