Each time I hear a homeless family tell their story I become even more committed to our goal of making homelessness rare, brief and one time. Their voices – more than the written word – stick with me for a very long time. More stories that stick will, I believe, result in more people committing to ending homelessness for families. The question is, how do we find those stories and help people tell their personal stories well?

We’re excited to announce a new storytelling workshop right here in the Pacific Northwest!

Photo Credit: Jason Falchook

Photo Credit: Jason Falchook

Our partners at Seattle University’s Project on Family Homelessness are partnering with the national non-profit The Moth to bring their acclaimed storytelling workshop to local homeless advocates. Selected participants will gain valuable storytelling skills from the experts, while honing their personal story about family homelessness into a compelling five-minute narrative.

People with a personal story about family homelessness are encouraged to apply. It may be hard for you to tell your story if you’ve experienced homelessness as a child. Or, you might work or volunteer for family homelessness service providers, advocacy organizations or faith communities and want to share your passion for justice with others. These workshops are for you!

Applications are being accepted now through Feb. 6, 2015, for Home: Lost and Found,” a series of storytelling workshops in February/March in Seattle. (If you just thought, “I will never be picked… so why bother?” THINK AGAIN! Please do apply!)

The sixteen people chosen to attend will be coached on how to craft their narrative into a five-minute story. All participants will be offered an opportunity to share those stories at the end of the workshop.  “Graduates” will also be considered for a public Moth event in April.

Participants will take what they’ve learned back to their organizations and share their new skills with all the storytellers there, resulting in more powerful stories for dozens of organizations!

Photo Credit: Roger Ho

Photo Credit: Roger Ho

Curious? Listen to this 5 minute story about a boy who realizes he’s poor.

For more information and to apply, please see the project page , or contact Sarah at The Moth, sarah@themoth.org, or Catherine Hinrichsen at Seattle U, hinrichc@seattleu.edu.