Homelessness research and evaluation can help frame the issue of homelessness, and offer us a opportunity to view the issue through a variety of perspectives.

Kids Count Data Book:  Find Washington Data here. WASHINGTON KIDS COUNT IS A JOINT EFFORT OF THE CHILDREN’S ALLIANCE AND WASHINGTON STATE BUDGET & POLICY CENTER

Homeless Analytics:  Access critical national, state, and local information about homelessness and related factors. (note: all WA state county data is not currently available)

NEW FINDINGS: STUDENT HOMELESSNESS ACROSS WASHINGTON STATE INCREASES 12% (Posted 2/27/14 by the Washington Alliance for Students Experiencing Homelessness)

                                        Approximately 1 in 34 students homeless:                                        All corners of Washington State affected

SEATTLE – During the 2012-13 school year, 30,609 students in Washington schools were identified by school districts as homeless—a 12% increase from the previous school year and an 82% increase from 2006-07. Columbia Legal Services (CLS) conducted an analysis of student homelessness trends over the past five years using data compiled by the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction’s Homeless Education Office. CLS hopes this updated analysis will help local school districts and communities understand the enormous scope of the problem and work to ease the crisis that far too many of Washington’s youngest residents face.

Key findings include:

  • 49% of homeless students are in fifth grade or below
  • All but seven counties have a homeless student population greater than 2%.
  • Almost a third (31%) of all homeless students attends school in rural areas. In many rural counties, the rate of homelessness is far above the average.
  • At least 1 in 20 students is homeless in eleven counties: Pend Oreille, Asotin, Grays Harbor, Mason, Pacific, Grant, Klickitat, Lewis, Douglas, Chelan, and Wahkiakum.
  • Since 2006-07, most counties (27) have seen student homelessness increase more than 50%. Almost half have seen student homelessness increase more than 100%.
  • 55% of homeless students are in the five most populous counties: Clark, King, Pierce, Snohomish, and Spokane.

“These findings highlight that no part of Washington State is untouched by the devastating impacts of student homelessness: rich, poor, urban, suburban, and rural,” said Katara Jordan, Attorney with the Children and Youth Project at CLS. “It is imperative that, as student homelessness increases, policymakers take an active role in developing clear, supportive, and focused policies that increase affordable housing and ensure that schools have the resources they need to ensure all students succeed.”

Educators, service providers, policymakers, advocates, reporters, and community members are encouraged to access our analysis page, where more information is available, including interactive charts, graphs, and other tools.

To download a PDF print version of our analysis please click here.

Washington State’s 2012–13 Homeless Children and Youth Data Report by School District (click to view the full data report)

2012-13 Homeless Children and Youth Data Report

WEBSITES:

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REPORTS:

Washington State County Analysis of Homeless Students (WA Budget and Policy Center 2012)

From Poverty to Prosperity 2012 Presentation Slides – (WA Budget and Policy Center)

Equity and Opportunity Mapping Puget Sound Regional Council 2010

Seattle-King County Coalition for the Homeless Turnaway Survey 2012

National Center for Homeless Education June 2012 Report

Effects of Social Support and Conflict on Parenting Among Homeless Mothers 2009

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Leading-a-Public-Private-Parntership_Recommendations-Based-on-WFF_FINAL[1]

Housing Market in Seattle–Rental Housing Availability

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